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Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Aug. 6, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. The 6:20 Man. David Baldacci. Grand Central 2. Portrait of an Unknown ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Aug. 6, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The 6:20 Man” by David Baldacci (Grand Central) Last week: 1 2. ...

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FICTION: A teenage girl gets pregnant in 1960s Ireland and surrenders the baby against her will. Thirty years later, a letter arrives. "The Making of Her" by Bernadette Jiwa; Dutton (336 pages, $26) ——— In 1964 in Catholic, Catholic Ireland, 17-year-old Joan falls hard for a young blond man she sees each evening, toiling up the hill on his bicycle near the factory where she works. She knows ...

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NONFICTION: A novelist recounts the experience of caring for her ailing, dependent mother. "Mothercare" by Lynne Tillman; Soft Skull Press (176 pages, $23) ——— "Death was a longtime fascination," novelist Lynne Tillman writes in "Mothercare," her powerful new memoir. At age 5, decades before the contours of a heartbreaking family illness became visible, she asked her father to bury her in a ...

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NONFICTION: In "Farewell Transmission," Will McGrath offers globetrotting essays on obscure lives and furtive vocations, alerting readers to secrets without and within. "Farewell Transmission: Notes From Hidden Spaces" by Will McGrath; Dzanc Books (216 pages, $16.95) ——— Why do those of us who love to travel love to travel? DePaul University professor of environmental science Liam Heneghan ...

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Ashton Kutcher revealed that an autoimmune disorder took away his vision, hearing and ability to walk. In a sneak peek of a new episode of “Running Wild With Bear Grylls: The Challenge,” obtained by Access Hollywood, Kutcher said he developed a rare autoimmune disorder called vasculitis, which can cause inflammation of the blood vessels. “Like two years ago, I had this weird, super rare form ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, July 30, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The 6:20 Man” by David Baldacci (Grand Central) Last week: 2 2. ...

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Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, July 30, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. The 6:20 Man. David Baldacci. Grand Central 2. Shattered. ...

Get ready to go back to the beginning. Prequel movies offering backstories for some of Hollywood’s biggest film franchises remain red hot, with the “Predator” origin story “Prey” roaring onto Hulu this Friday. Here are some of the other fan-favorite movies that got worthy prequels years later. ‘Star Wars’ A galaxy far, far away expanded in a massive way with three prequel flicks between 1999 ...

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FICTION: An engaging mystery about a journalist who investigates the disappearance of a student activist in Hong Kong. "On Java Road" by Lawrence Osborne; Hogarth (256 pages, $27) ——— Lawrence Osborne's fiction tracks the checkered fortunes of strangers in strange lands. Some of his peripatetic protagonists are culture-shocked, others try to fit in, but all end up out of their depth. In the ...

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NONFICTION: Erika Sánchez's memoir is a raw and raunchy coming-of-age tale. Believe it or not, it's also uplifting. "Crying in the Bathroom" by Erika Sánchez; Viking (256 pages, $27) ——— Erika Sánchez's debut novel for young adults, "I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter," offered a fictional account of the constraints of growing up in a poor immigrant family in Chicago. Sánchez's latest, ...

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Whether it's the weather or the season or something else, how to get yourself back reading. It might be the weather — sultry, lush and ripe. It might be the season — late summer, golden days to relish before the imminent Big Freeze. Or it might be that I sort of OD'd on books when I was on vacation, reading three normal-sized novels plus the entirety of "Bleak House." But whatever the reason, ...

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FICTION: An entertaining and occasionally edifying look at European immigrants making movies in Hollywood during World War II. "Mercury Pictures Presents" by Anthony Marra; Hogarth (432 pages, $28.99) ——— In fiscal year 2021, the United States welcomed fewer refugees than any comparable period since at least the mid-1970s. The record low stemmed from the openly hostile policies of the outgoing ...

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There's a temptation when speaking to directors of classic films to ask whether their career-defining movie could get a studio's green light today. The glossed-over reality, often, is that those pictures barely got made, even at the time. The script for 1988's "Bull Durham," an unconventional comedy set in the world of minor league baseball, was passed on by every studio in Hollywood. Twice. ...

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CHICAGO — Sara Paretsky returned to the scene of the crime. It was early June and traffic in River North on a Saturday morning was slow and quiet. Pet owners, pooches, strollers and the smell of toast. Paretsky was walking her dog along the north branch of the Chicago River. She was also out of poop bags. She asked a stranger for a spare. The woman, tugging back at the reigns of her own dog, ...

Don't miss "A Tidy Ending" by Joanna Cannon; Scribner (352 pages, $27) ——— Is there anything more delicious than an unreliable narrator? Reading an engrossing story and slowly realizing that the eyes through which you are seeing things might be a tad — skewed? Joanna Cannon's "A Tidy Ending" is told by Linda, a woman who has built a sturdy, ordinary life in an English town far away from her ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, July 23, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Portrait of an Unknown Woman: A Novel” by Daniel Silva (Harper) Last ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, July 23, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. Portrait of an Unknown Woman. Daniel Silva. Harper 2. The 6:20 Man. ...

When it rains, it pours. On Tuesday, Barack Obama dropped his 2022 summer reading list just as the Booker Prize, the U.K.'s most prestigious literary award, announced the 13 books on this year's longlist. The books on both lists are diverse in every way, ranging from crime and speculative fiction to a sweeping history of the New York Knicks and an examination of democracies. Every year, Obama ...

In late June, I wrote to Mike Davis to see if he'd be up for an interview. His reply: "If you don't mind the long trek to SD, I'd be happy to talk. I'm in the terminal stage of metastatic esophageal cancer but still up and around the house." Davis does not mince words. Still, he can tell some stories. Like this one: Born in Fontana, raised in El Cajon, he spent the '60s on the front lines of ...

LOS ANGELES — You can easily understand why Mike Davis might be glum. The Jeremiah of Southern California — the writer equally hailed and hated for decrying the dark side of the region's eternal boosterism — has battled cancer for the past five years. He recently decided to stop chemotherapy and is now at his San Diego home on palliative care. Doctors have given him months to live. The recent ...

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