Commentary: Governors must protect the health workers who protect us
AP

Commentary: Governors must protect the health workers who protect us

{{featured_button_text}}
California Gov. Gavin Newsom is interviewed while visiting the Hot and Cool Cafe in Los Angeles on June 3, 2020. California will allow film and television shoots to resume as soon as June 12, Newsom's office said on Friday, June 5, 2020.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom is interviewed while visiting the Hot and Cool Cafe in Los Angeles on June 3, 2020. California will allow film and television shoots to resume as soon as June 12, Newsom's office said on Friday, June 5, 2020. (Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

The federal government's response to COVID-19 has been haphazard, mismanaged and ultimately deadly. Yet the Trump administration is trumpeting the country's "success" against the pandemic, with the vice president recently declaring that the U.S. response to COVID-19 is "cause for celebration."

As doctors, we are not celebrating. With more than 125,000 people in the United States dead from COVID-19 and new cases climbing in 29 states, this is no time to let down our guard. And while the issue may have faded from the headlines, health workers in many parts of the country still lack personal protective equipment (PPE). Doctors' and nurses' pleas for masks and gloves may no longer be trending on social media, but the nationwide PPE crisis persists.

We have seen colleagues and friends forced to make impossible decisions - putting their own lives at risk to care for COVID-19 patients because they didn't have the proper protective equipment. Some health workers have lost their jobs for speaking out about these shortages. The danger is real: At least 939 health workers have died from COVID-19 in the U.S., according to National Nurses United, and this is likely an undercount. These deaths were largely preventable.

Whether we're still in the first wave of COVID-19 infections or preparing for the second, this much is true: We cannot abandon medical workers again by not providing the protective equipment they need. But to date, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has only issued voluntary worker-protection standards in health care settings. This leaves these standards unenforceable. Many complaints about potentially life-threatening safety issues have gone unaddressed.

With the Trump administration attempting to simply wish away the pandemic, it's again up to the states to shape the next phase of our response to COVID-19. Crucially, this includes a responsibility to protect the health workers on the front lines in the weeks and months ahead.

This is why thousands of health professionals, including our organization, Physicians for Human Rights, are calling on governors in all 50 states to exercise their authority to protect front-line health workers during the pandemic. That means setting clear and enforceable workplace safety standards, and mandating the provision of personal protective equipment. Governors should also enact clear standards for social distancing and hygiene measures, and enhance whistle-blower protections.

Recently, Virginia proposed the country's first-ever pandemic emergency workplace safety standards - the clearest signal yet of OSHA's neglect of its duty to protect health workers. The new state regulations are expected to include mandatory guidelines for PPE, sanitation and other workplace safety guidance, as well as protections from retaliation for health workers who speak out about safety concerns. This is an encouraging development, but whether it will save lives depends largely on the state's enforcement practices.

Some states, including Maryland and New York, have OSHA-approved state plans that meet or exceed national standards. That means they can impose stricter safety rules in public health-care facilities, and in some cases private ones, too. In places where there is no state plan, governors and state legislatures must step in and institute emergency standards for worker safety and enforcement that go beyond OSHA's voluntary measures. OSHA's non-enforceable standards currently set a very low bar for health worker safety during a pandemic. The states aiming higher will save lives.

Given these gaps, it is crucial that Maryland Governor Larry Hogan and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who serve as chair and vice-chair of the National Governors Association, respectively, exercise their leadership to push for universal protections for health care workers across the nation. States can look to the California model, where there are standards set and generally enforced by the state for social distancing, face masks, hand sanitizing, washing and gloves. California also boasts regular workplace disinfection, increased ventilation and notification of infections.

Beyond passing new standards, it is essential that states enforce them. Once issued, relevant state agencies should be mandated to enforce standards under their own authority. States' attorneys general should likewise be mandated to enforce these standards through the courts. States should also not overlook the critical importance of protecting health workers from discrimination or dismissal for speaking out in the face of dangerous conditions. Likewise, health workers should not face retribution for bringing additional personal protection to their jobs when employers are unable to provide adequate PPE.

As physicians, we know that the U.S. is still facing the biggest public health emergency in our lifetimes. The leadership of governors across the country has been vital in mitigating an even deadlier disaster. As we enter the fifth month of the coronavirus crisis, state-level leaders must rise to meet the moment. That means protecting the health workers who protect all of us.

___-

ABOUT THE WRITERS

Michele Heisler is medical director at Physicians for Human Rights and a professor of internal medicine and public health at the University of Michigan.

Ranit Mishori is senior medical adviser at Physicians for Human Rights and a professor of family medicine at Georgetown University.

Visit Bloomberg News at www.bloomberg.com

0
0
0
0
0

Catch the latest in Opinion

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

If there's a cruel way to handle an immigration issue, the nation can rest assured that the Trump administration will find it. The latest chapter in President Trump's book, "How to Close Down a Nation to Foreigners" (and no, that's not a real book), is a pending order that international students enrolled in U.S. colleges must attend in-person classes or leave the country. Never mind that the ...

Long before current market volatility, state and local pension debt posed a risk somewhere between a ticking time bomb and a crate of nitroglycerin. An explosion is coming eventually, and any major shock, whether related to COVID-19 or the next recession down the road, could set it off. As USA Today reported recently: "Before (the coronavirus) crisis even began, state pension plans across the ...

"Religious discrimination." It's an accusation we hear with increasing frequency. Indeed, discrimination on the basis of religion is one of the few common concerns our divided society has left. But even here, political polarization has left its mark. As conservatives use it, "religious discrimination" carries a meaning that is largely lost on the broader public. Now, with three new decisions ...

Facebook may finally stop lending its enormously powerful microphone and amplifier to deceitful politicians and manipulative campaigns. And in doing so, it would also block truthful candidates who are just trying to correct the record, outline their policies or encourage people to get out and vote. It's a fair trade as far as I'm concerned. Bloomberg's Kurt Wagner reported Friday afternoon ...

Under intense pressure from mostly Black community organizers, some local governments are responding to demands to defund the police and divest from law enforcement. The push to reduce police budgets and reliance on police intervention in noncriminal matters has been accompanied by calls to invest in more resources for people and communities. Not surprisingly, the same demands advanced by ...

President Donald Trump's proposal for a "National Garden of American Heroes," is a ludicrous, transparently political stunt. It's also his latest, ill-considered salvo against modern art and architecture. Back when the 45th president was a real estate developer, he dressed his skyscrapers in glitzy glass and metal. But ever since he moved into 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, he's gone retro, as he ...

The dual opinions that the Supreme Court issued Thursday concerning the release of President Donald Trump's financial records amount to a sound defeat for the White House's claims for aggrandized executive power. The court refused to break new ground to alter the constitutional power of the executive branch or the balance between it and Congress. Along the way, Chief Justice John G. Roberts ...

It's understandable that Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is outraged by President Donald Trump's decision to commute the sentence of his pal Roger Stone. Last year, a jury convicted the self-described dirty trickster of seven felony counts, including witness tampering and lying to Congress, and he was sentenced to three years and four months in prison. This cockeyed clemency would be a ...

Princeton University's president, Christopher L. Eisgruber, recently announced that Woodrow Wilson's name will be removed from the university's School of Public and International Affairs and from a residential college. No new facts prompted the decision, which was a reversal from Eisgruber's refusal just five years ago to remove Wilson's name from the program and buildings. Wilson's record as ...

We are four months away from what is shaping up to be a very strange presidential election - the strangest in many of our lifetimes. Americans will vote in an atmosphere of deep and bitter division. We are at each other's throats in a way we have not been since the 1960s. In some ways it may be worse than the 1960s. We will also hold this election in the context of a pandemic and parallel to a ...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alert

Breaking News