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Tens of thousands of suburban swing voters who helped fuel the Democratic Party’s gains of recent years are suddenly becoming Republicans. Overall, more than 1 million voters across 43 states have switched to the Republican Party over the last year. That's according to voter registration data analyzed by The Associated Press. They include both former Democrats and those previously unaffiliated with either major party. The phenomenon is playing out in virtually every region of the country — red states, blue states, in cities and in small towns — in the months since President Joe Biden replaced former President Donald Trump.

    One year ago, Joe Biden strode into his first Group of Seven summit as president and confidently told the closest U.S. allies that “America is Back.” Now, there are worries that America is backsliding. As Biden meets this week with the heads of G-7 leading democratic economies in the Bavarian Alps, he brings with him the baggage of domestic turmoil. The U.S. is grappling with political unrest, shocking mass shootings and the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to end constitutional protections for abortion. Biden says other world leaders at the summit haven't been asking him about the abortion ruling. But the domestic unrest is no doubt troubling to his European allies.

      Many observers expected the Jan. 6 committee hearings would be nothing more than reruns, but they've proven much more. They've revealed a storyteller's eye, with focus and clarity, an understanding of how news is digested these days and strong character development. The Republican House leadership's decision to walk away from the examination into former President Donald Trump's effort to stay in office essentially allowed the committee to structure it the way it wanted. The committee has kept a tight grip on the message, and the myriad ways that it is delivered after the hearings are concluded each day.

      Taraji P. Henson, Janelle Monae and Jazmine Sullivan were some of the big stars using the BET Awards stage to strongly criticize the Supreme Court’s recent decision to strip away women’s constitutional protection for abortion. Henson took the stage as the show’s host on Sunday with an uplifting message about “Black excellence” before she launched into the court’s overturning of the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling last week. The actor took the stage after Lizzo opened the show performing her single “About Damn Time.” Janelle Monae held up her middle finger toward the Supreme Court, while Sullivan made a plea to men for their support of women.

      As workers at major companies increasingly move to unionize, the political environment for labor couldn’t be more ripe. Perhaps nowhere is that more accurate than at the National Labor Relations Board. The agency’s top prosecutor, Jennifer Abruzzo, is seeking to overturn prior precedents and revive decades-old labor policies that supporters say would make it easier for workers to form a union. To get her wish, Abruzzo must have buy-in from the five-member board, whose Democratic majority is expected to be sympathetic to her proposed changes. But any such shifts in how the agency enforces labor law is likely to be reversed under a Republican administration and met with fierce resistance from employers in federal court.

      Police are investigating a weekend fire at a Christian pregnancy center in north-central Colorado as a possible arson. Police in Longmont responded to a fire at 3:17 a.m. Saturday. The Life Choices building sustained fire and heavy smoke damage. The front door was broken and the front of the building had been spray painted with the words, “if abortions aren't safe neither are you.” Life Choices' website says it offers free services related to pregnancy and sexual health, information on reversing the effects of abortion pills and post-abortion support for guilt, shame, anxiety and depression. Life Choices executive director Kathy Roberts said the center is devastated and stunned, and that the attack affects people who need support in their pregnancies.

      The suspect in a mass shooting during an LGBTQ festival in Norway has refused to explain his actions to investigators and will remain in pretrial custody for the next four weeks. The 42-year-old Norwegian citizen was arrested shortly after the attack in Oslo’s nightlife district early Saturday. Two people were killed and more than 20 were injured in what the Norwegian security service called an “Islamist terror act.” Oslo police said they tried to question the suspect on Saturday and again on Sunday without success. His defense lawyer told The Associated Press that the man refuses to have his statement recorded and videotaped unless police release the entire recording to the public.

      Praise and lament for the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned abortion rights filled sacred spaces this weekend. Clergy across the U.S. rearranged worship plans or rewrote sermons to provide their religious context -- and competing messages -- about the historic moment. Abortion is a visceral issue for deeply divided religious Americans in the wake of the seismic Dobbs v. Jackson decision. In Pittsburgh on Sunday, one Catholic priest called Friday “a day of great joy” because of the ruling, although a few people left during his homily. A minister in New York City mourned the decision, saying, “We are reeling.”

      Russia has shattered weeks of relative calm in Ukraine's capital with a missile attack as Western leaders meeting in Europe prepared to reaffirm their support for Ukraine and condemnation of Russia. President Volodymr Zelenskyy said a 37-year-old man was killed and his daughter and wife injured when missiles hit an apartment building. A railroad worker was also reported killed. Kyiv's mayor speculated the airstrikes were “a symbolic attack” before a NATO summit starting Tuesday. A former U.S. commander in Europe said they also were a signal to Group of Seven leaders meeting Sunday. The Ukrainian air force says planes launched the missiles from over the Caspian Sea, more than 1,500 kilometers (932 miles) away.

      An abortion rights protest in Portland, Oregon, turned destructive over the weekend, with some people breaking windows on businesses and vehicles and scrawling graffiti. Portland Police say no one was immediately arrested because they did not have the resources to intervene. The event began with a gathering of about 200 people at a park on Saturday before a group of about 60 of them — most dressed in black — marched down a street and smashed windows on banks, coffee shops, a Portland school van and a Tesla, while vandalizing a center that provides services to pregnant people. Police said the damage occurred over a period of about 35 minutes.

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      The Daily News Ask the Expert answers those common and not so common questions and gives you some insight and guidance from professionals in their field. Check out the great videos and stories from local businesses.

      A Detroit woman has been charged in the death of her 3-year-old son after police found the boy’s decomposing body in a basement freezer. Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy said Sunday the 31-year-old woman is charged with first-degree murder, child abuse and torture and concealing the death of an individual. She had an arraignment Sunday and was remanded to jail. Detroit police officers and members of Child Protective Services were conducting a welfare check at the home early Friday when they discovered the boy’s body. Detroit Police Chief James White said it was not immediately clear how or when the boy died or how long his body had been in the freezer.

      President Joe Biden and Western allies at a three-day summit in the Bavarian Alps say they're intent on keeping economic fallout from the war in Ukraine from fracturing the global coalition working to punish Russia’s aggression. Britain’s Boris Johnson warned the leaders not to give in to “fatigue” even as Russia lobbed new missiles at Kyiv. Biden says the coalition of countries can't let Russian President Vladimir Putin play the countries off of one another and break down their resolve. Leaders of the Group of Seven top economies opened their annual summit in Germany on Sunday. Biden also announced that G-7 nations will ban imports of Russian gold. Gold is a top Russian export.

      Gun deaths in Oklahoma have increased since a “permitless carry” law allowing people over the age of 21 to carry a gun without a permit or training went into effect in 2019, according to a newspaper’s review of data. The Oklahoman analyzed state medical examiner data. It found that Oklahoma has recorded some of its deadliest months in history since the law took effect. In the decade before “permitless carry,” only 10 months had 70 or more firearm deaths. From November 2019 until January, there were 10 months with more than 70 gun-related deaths. Following recent mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, Uvalde, Texas, and in Tulsa, Republican leaders in Oklahoma haven't shown interest in any gun control measures.

      Police in North Macedonia say they discovered 24 migrants hiding in a van on a major highway in the country’s south Sunday and arrested two Macedonia men as suspected people smugglers. Police think the people inside the van entered North Macedonia illegally from Greece, with plans to continue on to Serbia and then wealthier European countries. They were transferred to a migrant reception center in the border town of Gevgelija, pending deportation to Greece. Police say they intercepted a number of people in recent weeks as the so-called Balkan route, which runs through North Macedonia, has become more active following the lifting of COVID-19 travel restrictions.

      The leader of Bosnia’s Serbs says he hopes former U.S. President Donald Trump returns to power. Milorad Dodik said on Sunday that Serbs will “wait for appropriate global circumstances” to reach for their goal of seceding from Bosnia, which he called an “unsustainable state.” Dodik made the comments at a gathering marking the start of Bosnia's bloody breakup of Bosnia 30 years ago. More than 100,000 people died before a U.S.-brokered peace deal ended the country's 1992-95 war. Russia’s war in Ukraine has aroused fears that the turmoil could spill over to the volatile Balkans. Dodik met with Russian President Vladimir Putin earlier this month and says he's proud to have done so.

      Pride parades kicked off in some of America’s biggest cities Sunday amid new fears about the potential erosion of freedoms won through decades of activism. The annual marches in New York, San Francisco, Chicago and elsewhere take place after at least one Supreme Court justice signaled, in a ruling on abortion, that the court could reconsider the right to same-sex marriage recognized in 2015. That warning shot came after a year of legislative defeats for the LGBTQ community, including the passage of laws in some states limiting the discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity with children.

      Protests outside the Arizona Capitol over the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade that ended with a volley of tear gas are being described as either peaceful or driven by anarchists intent on destruction. Republican Senate President Karen Fann issued a news release describing it as a thwarted insurrection, while protesters called it a violent overreaction by police who they said acted without warning or justification. As many as 8,000 people gathered Friday night, most peacefully protesting the court decision. But some began banging on the windows and glass doors of the state Senate. State police say they believed they were trying to break in so they used tear gas. No arrests or injuries were reported.

      Alabama's Republican Party has declared a tie in the primary race for a state Senate seat and says the winner will be chosen by lot. The party's Candidate Committee held a hearing Saturday and said the District 27 race between Auburn City Councilman Jay Hovey and incumbent Tom Whatley was officially a tie. It said the winner would be determined in accordance with the state election code. The code says the Secretary of State shall decide the winner by lot. The district covers Tallapoosa, Lee and Russell counties. The GOP news release did not provide details on when the winner would be selected or the method to be used.

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