GT flood 14

Surf's up: Southeast Crystal Lake Drive formed a dam and created this falls-like situation when swift-flowing water, from the south Corvallis millrace washed it over it during recent flooding.

Bill Monroe, Gazette-Times (File)

The following article originally ran in the Friday, Jan. 18, 1974, edition of the Corvallis Gazette-Times.

An estimated $500,000 in flood damage has occurred in Benton County, not including railroad or state highways, Corvallis city and county officials reported this morning to Gov. Tom McCall.

"This is strictly a ballpark estimate made yesterday afternoon and doesn't include flood damage to the Southern Pacific railroad tracks or state highways, which could be another $500,000," said James A. Blodgett, director of emergency services for Benton County.

There was an estimated $150,000 in damage to county roads.

Asst. City Manager Eugene McAdams estimated $20,000 damage to Corvallis city streets, utilities and parks.

South Corvallis alone had an estimated $250,000 in flood damage to private property, added C. Lloyd Anderson, county assessor.

W. Lee Allen of the Department of Agriculture's Stabilization and Conservation office, said damage in the county to agricultural buildings, property, debris and roads, including loss of a barn and its contents in the Alpine area, was $40,000.

Asked if return of rainfall this morning after a 24-hour respite will cause further flood damage, Blodgett said, "I think we're out of the woods at this time."

He noted that all major roads, but not some of the county roads, were open to traffic this morning.

Flood stage for the Marys and the Willamette rivers at Corvallis is 20 feet. At 7 a.m. this morning the Marys was 18.9 feet and the Willamette 17.7 feet.

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